BCBusiness Magazine | October 2013

BCBusiness magazine, October 2013
cover
Now in its 20th year, the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year awards continue to shine a light on the province’s most innovative minds with the prowess to turn bright ideas into big businesses and even bigger profits. Here’s to the Class of 2013.
by Kristen Hilderman, David Jordan, Oliver Lam, Kate MacLennan, Lindsey Peacock and Jessica Werb
features
With a master plan of curing cancer, hematologist and Stemcell Technologies Inc. CEO Allen Eaves has built a $70-million company while the rest of B.C.’s bio-tech sector hit a brick wall. Without venture capital, without a board and without an exit plan, he’s a lone crusader on a medical mission.
by Anne Casselman
Squamish’s Quest University is the brainchild of former UBC president David Strangway and is a rare example of innovation in higher education. But the independent school needs more private money if it’s going to keep its doors open for future generations.
by Brenda Bouw
Frontlines
REAL ESTATE
It Takes a Village
Striving to create new urbanism in the Lower Mainland means eschewing antiquated shopping malls for open-concept villages and main streets.
by Oliver Lam
TRANSPORTATION
Craig Richmond
Former fighter pilot and new YVR president and CEO Craig Richmond discusses global influence and the Vancouver airport’s next chapter.
by David Jordan
How Douglas Coupland’s V-Pole and a newly designed cell tower could transform our urban landscape.
by Lindsey Peacock
MARKETING
Selling History
A look at the sometimes sad afterlives of iconic Vancouver signs.
by Kristen Hilderman


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